Affiliate and Email Marketing – What’s the Difference?

Did you know that affiliate marketing is also known as email marketing? The terms are often used interchangeably, but they are actually quite different. I’ll discuss the main differences between affiliate marketing and email marketing, and how you can use each one to its advantage.

Key Differences Between Affiliate Marketing and Email Marketing

There are several important differences between affiliate marketing and email marketing, the first one being the target audience. Typically, affiliate marketing is directed at general website visitors, while email marketing is sent to a subset of those visitors. In other words, affiliate marketing is broadcasted to the masses, while email marketing is solicited (asked for).

The second major difference is the monetization strategy. With affiliate marketing, the focus is on generating revenue through product sales and referral partnerships. In other words, you’ll typically find affiliate marketing activities within the context of eCommerce stores and online marketplaces. On the other hand, email marketing is often used as a standalone strategy, without any regard to product sales. The goal is to drive revenue through email marketing activities, such as SEO, email list building, and paid email marketing.

The third and arguably the most significant difference between affiliate marketing and email marketing is the metrics used to measure success. With affiliate marketing, the key performance indicators (KPIs) include both quantitative and qualitative metrics. The former includes things like revenue, purchase amounts, and conversion rates. The latter includes things like brand awareness, engagement, and conversion.

In contrast, the key performance indicators (KPIs) for email marketing are limited purely to quantitative metrics, like opens, clicks, and unsubscribes. In other words, affiliate marketing embraces a more holistic view of digital marketing, while email marketing is focused solely on the numbers.

Why Should You Use Email Marketing Instead Of Affiliate Marketing?

Why should you use email marketing instead of affiliate marketing? You may wonder this yourself, since the terms are so often used interchangeably. Let’s examine the reasons behind this.

One major reason is that email marketing allows you to target the right audience. Did you know that you can target specific groups of people based on their interests, hobbies, and demographic? For example, you can use email marketing to send welcome emails to new subscribers, or you can use it to boost fundraising by sending an invite to connect with your organization’s email list.

In addition, email marketing allows you to test different content and campaigns using A/B split testing. You can also measure the success of a particular campaign and tweak your strategy based on the results. For example, if you notice that a particular email campaign is driving a significant increase in clicks and conversions, but you’re not seeing any revenue, you may decide that a different approach needs to be taken.

On the other hand, affiliate marketing often involves partnering with product vendors and publishers to generate revenue. While this may seem like a better option for monetizing, the major downside is that you’ll have to find a product that has enough demand, and that people are willing to pay for.

How Can You Use Affiliate Marketing To Its Full Potential?

If you’ve been following my blog posts for any length of time, you know that I believe in using diverse tactics to achieve growth. That’s because I think that the more channels you use to distribute your content, the greater the chance of driving organic traffic to your site.

If you want to use affiliate marketing to its full potential, you need to follow the three C’s: content, conversion, and clicks. I’ll discuss each one in turn.

Content Is King

Did you know that Google prioritizes websites that have a significant amount of valuable content? In other words, if you want to increase your SEO, you need to focus on producing more content that is both useful and engaging. Luckily, you can use a wide variety of tools to make content creation easy and fun. From video tutorials to eBooks, blogs to opinions pieces, and more, you can use content marketing to generate quality leads and boost engagement.

In addition, you should also be making use of various forms of content, such as images, screenshots, and videos. People like to read, watch, and listen to content that they can relate to or learn from.

Conversion

Did you know that every ecommerce store or online marketplace has one thing in common – they all want to make money from product sales? That’s why it’s important to gain a foothold in the right place, be that as part of a larger platform like Shopify, or as a standalone business.

In order to achieve that goal, you need to focus on increasing conversions – getting visitors to take the desired action (i.e. purchasing a product or service)

Luckily, there are various ways to increase conversions. For example, you can use paid advertising, SEO, or content creation to drive traffic to your site. If you want to learn more, check out this SMART Guide to Conversion.

Regardless, you should always be looking for ways to improve your conversion rates. Did you know that a significant number of people leave an eCommerce store’s checkout page without making a purchase? In other words, there’s always room for increase in conversions. Finding a way to increase those conversions is the key to making money online.

Clicks

Did you know that a website’s conversion rate is often measured as the number of clicks (i.e. mouse clicks) divided by the number of visitors? Basically, the more clicks you get, the better.

If you want to make money using affiliate marketing, you need to focus on increasing the number of clicks on your promoted links and content. Fortunately, there’s a way to do that – using paid advertising.

You may wonder what paid advertising is and why you should care. Basically, paid advertising is where you’re paying to have your product or service branded in front of specific audiences, typically through organic search results or site content.

If you want to get really technical, paid advertising includes things like sponsored stories on social media platforms, like Twitter and Facebook, as well as Google AdWords, which is what I use personally.

As you can probably guess, I prefer to use organic search results, as I think they present the cleanest and most honest picture of a product or service. If you click here, you’ll be taken to my personal Google Ads, where you can find examples of my paid advertising strategy.

Regardless, paid advertising is a great way to generate clicks, and thus revenue, from a wide variety of sources. Did you know that you can run ads on bloggers’ websites? Run ads on content curators’ websites? Or even run ads on social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook?

How Can You Use Email Marketing To Its Full Potential?

Now that you’re sufficiently armed with the knowledge of affiliate marketing versus email marketing, it’s time to put it into practice. Let’s look at how you can use email marketing to its full potential.

As discussed, the main difference between these two methods is the target audience. Typically, affiliate marketing is directed at general website visitors, while email marketing is sent to a subset of those visitors. In other words, affiliate marketing is broadcasted to the masses, while email marketing is solicited (asked for).

The second major difference is the monetization strategy. With affiliate marketing, the focus is on generating revenue through product sales and referral partnerships. In other words, you’ll typically find affiliate marketing activities within the context of eCommerce stores and online marketplaces. On the other hand, email marketing is often used as a standalone strategy, without any regard to product sales. The goal is to drive revenue through email marketing activities, like SEO, email list building, and paid email marketing.

The third and arguably the most significant difference between affiliate marketing and email marketing is the metrics used to measure success. With affiliate marketing, the key performance indicators (KPIs) include both quantitative and qualitative metrics. The former includes things like revenue, purchase amounts, and conversion rates. The latter includes things like brand awareness, engagement, and conversion.

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