How to Become a Salesforce Job Analyst in 5 Steps

When you’re building a business case for IT, there are several factors that you need to keep in mind: Productivity, Cost, Uptime, Support, and Scalability. Knowing how to evaluate these factors and present a convincing case is vital for any job role, but it’s even more important for the Job Analyst charged with assessing these factors and recommending an upgrade or a new implementation of Salesforce. In order to become a Salesforce Job Analyst, you need to start by learning about these important Salesforce terms and learning how to present a compelling case for your audience. Let’s take a look at each part of a Salesforce implementation job analysis and how you can present this information to your manager.

Productivity

Productivity is a measure of how efficiently your organization is operating and how much value you’re delivering to your customers. For instance, are you driving revenue in the right direction? Are you measuring the right metrics? Is your team delivering high-quality work? Productivity Analysis is a task within the Job Analyst role that will allow you to measure and report on these critical metrics so that your manager knows you’re taking the job seriously and are a good fit for the role.

Uptime

No one cares about your product as much as you do. Unfortunately, there’s no direct correlation between how much you care and how well your product is performing. When you’re doing your job analysis, you’ll analyze service level agreements (SLAs) and outage reports to determine your product’s uptime. Basically, your manager will want to know how often your product is down and for how long. Knowing this information will also help you determine how frequently you should be testing, monitoring, and repairing your product. For example, if you’re finding that your product is down a lot (especially considering how much time it’s been up since your last fix), then you might want to increase the frequency of your tests and expedite the process of fixing bugs before they arise. In this case, you should also consider evaluating the performance of your team members to determine who is responsible for keeping your product running smoothly. You might want to hire more experienced developers or task engineers, who know how to troubleshoot complex issues efficiently. In most cases, a poor performing team member will be the root cause of many production issues. By identifying and fixing these problems before they affect the productivity of your entire team, you’ll be able to drastically improve the quality of your work and the experience you provide to your customers. Having a well-oiled machine is essential for keeping your product churning out high-quality work consistently. When the time comes to negotiate your salary, know that you’ll be competing for jobs with other marketing professionals. However, at least you’ll have the knowledge and the background to justify your higher salary.

Scalability

Sometimes, your product just won’t be able to handle the demand. In these cases, it’s important to look at the scalability of your solution. When you’re analyzing the scalability of your product, you’ll be looking at both the available resources (e.g., computing power, network capacity, etc.) as well as the team’s experience in dealing with heavy traffic and high volumes of work. If you’re not sure what this means, ask your manager or a mentor who works in a similar role. Scalability Analysis is part of the Job Analyst’s responsibility and will allow you to report on whether your product can support the anticipated growth your organization is going through. Having the ability to scale efficiently is key to your organization realizing its full potential and becoming a top-notch resource in your industry. The more experience you have in dealing with large amounts of data, the better. There are several tools available to help you analyze scalability (e.g., Google Sheets, Excel Solver, etc.), so take some time to learn these tools and present your findings to your manager. Don’t expect that carrying out a job analysis will instantly turn you into a job hero; it will take some time before your manager realizes just how much your contributions have helped the organization grow and change for the better. Sometimes, these things just take time.

Cost

If you want your organization to flourish, then you should care about the money as well. A healthy profit margin is great, but you should also know how much it costs to operate your business. Every business has different financial constraints, so it’s important to look at the financial implications of your decision before you make it. When you’re doing your cost analysis, you’ll look at the price of the product itself as well as the cost of the staff involved (both directly and indirectly). Indirect costs are fees for things such as utilities, transportation, and accommodation that your organization is paying for but will benefit from the implementation of your product. Direct costs are the salaries of the people directly involved in the implementation of your product, such as developers and QA staff. Your manager will want to know what these costs are so that he can have an idea of whether or not this is a cost-effective solution for the organization.

Support

Your organization’s support team is the group of people you call on to help your product when it encounters issues. Whether you have a dedicated support team or you’re depending on volunteers, you’ll still need to analyze the availability of these resources as well as their skill sets. Support Analysis is a vital part of any job analysis and allows you to determine the level of support you can expect from your organization in case you encounter problems with your product. While you can’t control whether or not your product will encounter issues, you can control how you deal with them. Will you depend on Google to help you with questions? Will you reach out to an individual in your organization for help? Your manager will want to know what your plan of action is in case there’s an issue, so that he can be sure you have everything you need to help your product operate at its best.

Role

Another important aspect of any analysis is considering what role you’ll be playing in the process. As the name would suggest, Job Analysis is all about role playing, so you’ll be taking on the role of a job searcher and will be using your skills and experience to determine if this new role is right for you.

When you’re building your business case for IT, there are several factors that you need to keep in mind: Productivity, Cost, Uptime, Support, and Scalability. Knowing how to evaluate these factors and present a compelling case is vital for any job role, but it’s even more important for the Job Analyst charged with assessing these factors and recommending an upgrade or a new implementation of Salesforce. In order to become a Salesforce Job Analyst, you need to start by learning about these important Salesforce terms and learning how to present a compelling case for your audience. Let’s take a look at each part of a Salesforce implementation job analysis and how you can present this information to your manager.

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