How to Make an Email Introductory That Will Convert Customers to Buyers

When you send an email to a potential customer, you have about a 50% chance of getting them to click ‘accept’ or ‘decline’ your offer. You can make this process much simpler for yourself by using an email intro that will convince them to click “accept”.

Whether you’re selling a service or product, or both, there’s a common email greeting that’s effective with any type of business.

You can follow this formula to write an email intro that will help you convert more customers to buyers:

Personalize the Email

Before you write a single word of the email, take a minute to think about how you would react if you received such an email. How would you react if you saw an email from your bank or brokerage firm, for example?

Would you open it? Read it? Click “accept” or “decline”?

This is why, when you write your email introduction, you need to personalize it. You want to make sure that the person reading it feels that your offer is just for them. Otherwise, it could be a real head-scratcher when they come back to your site and find that the offer is not relevant to what they’re looking for. (And no, using an auto-responder tool to send out an entire email campaign that looks like it’s from a mass mailing service, isn’t going to make things better)

Use Keywords

If you follow the guidelines above, you’ll notice that I put a lot of emphasis on personalizing the email and making it relevant to the recipient. This is why you should use keywords in your email. If you get the words “free” and “offer” wrong in the context of your email, you could seriously damage your credibility with potential customers. (And trust me, the damage is more than possible.)

Imagine getting an email from a bank with the subject line, “Free $500 Credit!” You’re probably not going to assume that they meant you, the recipient, and that the “credit” they’re offering is for your bank account. If you use keywords in your email, the person you’re sending it to will have a much better chance of understanding what you’re trying to say. (And if they don’t, then you certainly don’t want them to continue reading anyway. You can always revise your email later to make things more clear)

Use Action Words

When you get in the habit of writing emails like the example above, you’ll start seeing language that is much more effective at getting your point across. You want to use action words like “accept”, “call”, “click”, “order”, and “subscribe”. (And yes, you can use an auto-responder to send out these emails if you want to. Just make sure that you follow the template I provided above to make sure that you’re not harming your own credibility in the process.)

The advantage of using action words is that the reader knows what you want them to do. You don’t have to explain to them that you want them to click “accept” or “decline”. Simply using action words is enough to give them that direction. (In the example above, I used “accept” and “decline” because that’s what I want the bank to do. However, if I was trying to get my blog readers to visit my site, I would use “click here” or “read more”. You get the point.)

Avoid Clutter

Keep your emails easy to understand by using simpler sentences and eliminating unnecessary words. For example, your email could start with, “Hi, I’m an email marketer at [your-company-name] and I was wondering if I could get some [blog article idea].”

Then, you would simply list the benefits that the article will provide to them. Keep it short and sweet. (And no, including a picture of yourself in your pitch does not make it better.)

Less is more. Keep your offers simple and easy to understand, and you’ll gain the advantage of a customer who is much more likely to purchase from you.

Make It Simpler

There are two big mistakes that you need to avoid when writing an email intro. The first one is making it too complex. If you start seeing words like “amongst” and “including” in your headline, then you’re doing it wrong. Stick to simple, direct language. (Not easy language, but simply the language that is direct and to the point.)

If somebody is reading your email and does not understand what you’re trying to say, it’s going to be difficult to gain their trust and convince them to do business with you. If you want to stand out amongst the rest of the emails, make sure that your language is simple enough for anybody to understand.

Here’s another example: Instead of “Hi, my name is James and I’ll be your personal assistant for the next 30 days”, try something like, “Hello, James, I’m wondering if you could help me with X. I’m looking for a way to handle Y, and you seem to know how to do it perfectly. Would you be willing to tell me about it?” (Notice how the second example is much simpler and more direct?)

Now, I’m not saying that you have to be a fancy English major to write an effective email introduction. Anyone can learn how to do this. (I myself have only been able to do this because I practiced a lot and became very familiar with how to write an effective email.)

The point is that if you want to write an effective email introduction, you need to keep things simple and make sure that the person reading it actually understands what you’re saying. (And no, using a fake name or a made-up position does not make your email any more effective. The person receiving it will not be able to connect with you if they do not recognize your voice.)

Focus On One Question

When you ask a question in your email, you’re drawing attention to a specific area that you think needs clarification. If you’ve followed the above suggestions, then you will have clearly stated what you want and why you’re asking. (And yes, including a few examples of what you’re trying to achieve will certainly help your reader understand your intent.)

Instead of, “How can I persuade you to visit my site?”, try something like, “I hope this email doesn’t come across as too sales-y. But I’m an email marketer at [your-company-name] and wondered if I could get some [blog article idea]. I noticed your site because it had great content and was wondering if I could get some similar content to help my target audience.”

You get the point. By keeping things simple and to the point, you give yourself a chance at being understood. (And even if you do end up sending the email to the wrong person, you can always revise it later.)

Build Up To A Call To Action

When you get in the habit of writing emails like the example above, you’ll start seeing language that is much more effective at getting your point across. You want to use keywords in your email. If you get the words “free” and “offer” wrong in the context of your email, you could seriously damage your credibility with potential customers. (And trust me, the damage is more than possible.)

If someone is reading your email and doesn’t understand what you’re trying to say, it’s going to be difficult to gain their trust and convince them to do business with you. If you want to stand out amongst the rest of the emails, make sure that your language is simple enough for anybody to understand.

Here’s another example: Instead of “Hi, I’m an email marketer at [your-company-name] and wondered if I could get some [blog article idea]”, try something like, “Hey, there. I’m an email marketer at [your-company-name] and I noticed your site because it had great content and was wondering if I could get some similar content to help my target audience.”

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